Teens

  1. The Last Dragonslayer

    Image: Last Dragonslayer book cover

    The quick version: The most fun fantasy story--perhaps the most fun novel--that I've read all year, and despite it's "young adult" label, it doesn't feel like a YA novel. Keep reading for the detailed review.

    Why is this series not simultaneously published in the US?

  2. The Age of Miracles

    The Age of Miracles

    A co-worker gave this to me to read because she thought it was my kind of book. I had never heard of it, but boy am I glad she thought of me, this book is amazing! Julia, an 11 year old girl in California, is the narrator of the story and the tale she has to tell is riveting. The days on earth are inexplicably getting longer, what they refer to in the book as "the slowing". There is no explanation for why this is happening, but it is soon apparent that this is not an illusion and it also is not temporary. Each day is longer, as are the nights.

  3. Bad Glass

    Bad Glass

    Bad Glass has a great premise, especially if you are a fan of “what if” science fiction. The science here is physics, or perhaps metaphysics. We never find out. But weird things are happening in Spokane, WA. The military has separated the phenomena into 4 categories: things that appear that should not be there, things that disappear that should be there, voices/noises that have no apparent origin and “all else”. Most fall into the “all else” category; especially the human body parts that meld into inanimate materials, or that become part of other bodies.

  4. Between Gears

    Between Gears book cover

    Review in brief: A comic book enthusiast and artist documents her senior year in college a page a day. Strongest recommendation to students interested in becoming artists themselves, but recommended generally to those between the ages of 14 and 35. The full review starts now.

    I don't think there's any way for me to describe Natalie Nourigat's Between Gears in a way that conveys how much I enjoyed it.

  5. Paper Towns

    Image: Paper Towns book cover

    John Green’s Paper Towns imagines a unique high school queen bee named Margo Roth Spiegelman and the mystery of finding her. Quentin Jacobsen narrates the story, beginning with a childhood memory of finding a dead body in the neighborhood park with Margo. While Quentin and Margo grew apart over the years, he holds a flame for her and she holds the high school’s ruling class back from bullying Quentin too much.

  6. Bunny Drop

    Every so often, I'll try a manga. As the young adult librarian, I feel like that's something I should do. I'll hear from teen patrons that they love a title more than life itself and give it a try. Then, often, I'll miss whatever it was that made the manga so great--it's okay, I'm at a different place in life than the teens I work with, but I'd prefer to relate to them through shared love of a story.

  7. Ready Player One

    Ready Player One takes place in a stark, near future where people hide from their dark reality in the OASIS, a virtual world created by James Halliday. As the story takes off lifelong gamer and game creator Halliday has just died and left behind one last game for the ages.

  8. Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend

    Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend Book Cover

    Budo is six years old, but he looks like an adult. To the people who can see him, that is--he is an imaginary friend, visible only to his human imaginer Max and to other imaginary friends. Imaginary friends are born from people's, pimarily chilrden's, minds and come out looking like pretty much anything--a fully formed person like Budo, a spot on a wall, a robot, whatever. One day, they're imagined and exist, knowing what their humans think they know.

  9. Going Bovine

    Going Bovine book cover

    When Cameron is diagnosed with Mad Cow disease his life changes drastically. No longer is he the social pariah shunned by his twin sister, nor is he an embarrassment to his parents. The school he hates puts on a pep rally especially for him that he gets to watch on his living room television, just before he passes out and is taken to the hospital. 

  10. Artemis Fowl series

    Artemis Fowl (series)

    This summer the latest and most-likely last (hopefully not!) installment of the Artemis Fowl series, by Eoin Colfer (pronounced Owen), was released. The 8 books follow Artemis’ adventures with the Fairy world: dwarves, trolls, goblins, centaurs, pixies, and more; they all live under the earth’s surface but pop up every now and then. Artemis is a young, criminal mastermind, determined to steal Fairy gold to fund the search for his missing father and to refill the family fortune’s rapidly emptying coffers.

  11. Listening Is an Act of Love

    If you listen to NPR on Friday mornings, you may be familiar with the interviews from David Isay’s StoryCorps Project.  Shortly after 9/11, David Isay decided he wanted to record an oral history of America.  Not just any history, mind you, he set out to capture the lives of everyday Americans --- your average John & Jane Doe, not the elite upper-crust celebrities that traditionally dominate the media.  He set up a recording booth in Grand Central Station in New York City where family members and friends can record interviews with each other.  It became so popular tha

  12. There Is No Dog

    There Is No Dog

    I liked Meg Rosoff's There is No Dog. It's a funny, somewhat scattered, odd little story that I wasn't expecting. I think when you read the blurb on a book that tells you God is a stereotypical teen boy, you get some expectations--like seeing a preview for a Will Farrel movie. I expected much more zaniness than this story brought, and I appreciate that the humor was more understated.

  13. Dead Reckoning

    Dead Reckoning

    Two strong young women are traveling through the dangerous Wild West of the late 1800s. Jett came from a wealthy New Orleans family, whose wealth and home were destroyed during the Civil War, so she hates Yankees.  She doesn’t believe her twin brother Philip is dead, and is traveling the West by horseback to find him.  In order to be safe she dresses like a male gunslinger, and earns her way by gambling, though she longs to return to her old life.

  14. Zombies vs. Unicorns

    Zombies vs. Unicorns

    The question on everyone's mind these days: Which is better, Zombies or Unicorns? This unique short story collection pits the walking dead against magic glitter in a grudge match unlike any other. Edited by Holly Black and Justine Larbalestier, this collection features some of the best teen authors writing today, including Libba Bray, Garth Nix, and Cassandra Clare.

  15. Assault With a Deadly Glue Gun

    Assault with a deadly glue gun
    The first title in a new series, this is a stitch from beginning to end! (Pun intended) The heroine, Anastasia Pollack, is the crafts editor at what she describes as a"medium classy" national women's magazine. She has just been informed her husband was not out of town at a work meeting, but gambling in Las Vegas, keeled over and died. Sounds funny so far, right? Suddenly she is a widow, with enormous debts, no assets, and a self-proclaimed communist mother in law (and devil-dog) permanently living with her. But the surprises just keep on coming!
  16. Mornings with Barney

    Mornings with Barney

    I know, I know, we all cried when we read or saw Marley and Me. Do you really want to read another book about a man and his dog? I say yes, you do -- this one is different. By now you have figured out that I am a sucker for any animal story.

  17. Things We Didn't Say

    Things We Didn't Say

    I really liked this book!  The title is absolutely perfect, and says it all.  The characters and their interactions are very real; you are smack dab in the middle of this family’s life.  Mom and dad are divorced, the kids live with dad, and he is engaged to a woman they barely know, much less trust.  You feel their hopes, share their dreams and hurts with each disappointment.  The story is told through the voice of one character at a time; each character gets their turn to talk, but they talk only to you and not each other.  And that, dear reader, is the proble

  18. The True Story of Hansel and Gretel

    True Story of Hansel and Gretel

    Will we ever truly understand what it was like to be Jewish in World War II? Probably not, but this book adds another perspective. Just like in the fairy tale you remember, two children are abandoned in the woods and if you pay close attention there is even a trail of breadcrumbs. But it isn't because the stepmother doesn't like them. The family is running for their very lives. They must all lose their identities in order to survive. Even their names have to change. There is a cottage in the woods, a mysterious and frightening old woman, and a big oven.

  19. The Night Circus: a novel

    The Night Circus
    Le Cirque des Rêves arrives without fanfare and without invitation. Dozens of black-and-white striped tents cover a local field, but no one and nothing moves during the day. The circus is only open at night, when it becomes an extraordinary wonderland of tents, each providing a fantastic magical act, animal show or acrobats performing remarkable feats. There is no color at the circus—everything is black or white, even the flames of the bonfire. One day it will disappear as quietly as it came, only to reappear somewhere else around the globe.
  20. Map of True Places

    Map of True Places

    Brunonia Barry is back with an emotionally resonant novel of tragedy, secrets, identity and love.

  21. Patrick F. McManus' outdoor humor

    Patrick F. McManus

    If you consider yourself an outdoorsperson or know someone who loves hunting, fishing, camping or outdoor gear, you will likely enjoy the humor of Patrick F. McManus. His life stories and musings are a mix of truth and exaggeration featuring many memorable characters, like mountain-man-old-timer Rancid Crabtree, and Crazy Eddie Muldoon: a great child-inventor who always had a new, 'good idea' of how to 'surprise' his parents. ("And guess what, Pat! You get to test the deep sea diving outfit! Don't that sound fun?!")

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