Food

  1. Books on Fermenting

    Books on Fermentation

     

    Over the last couple years there are several books on fermentation that I have quite enjoyed.

    Wild Fermentation, by Sandor Katz

    The Art of Fermentation: an in-depth exploration of essential concepts and processes from around the world, by Sandor Katz

  2. Great Balls of Cheese

    Great Balls of Cheese, by Michelle Buffardi

    Just in time for the holidays, this short cookbook has new and traditional sweet and savory cheese ball recipes. If you are inclined, take the time to copy the cheese-ball-sculptures; it will definitely amuse your friends and family. While I'm not one to spend much time on presentation (solely due to lack of skill), the recipes themselves are really good on their own.

  3. The Flavor of Wisconsin for Kids

    The Flavor of Wisconsin For Kids

    From brats on the grill and festival fare to fresh farm market fruits and veggies, food is an essential part of summer fun in Wisconsin.  Savor the flavors with this feast of fun facts, history and recipes by local food expert Allen and local history writer Malone.

  4. The art of cookbooks

    Modern Art Desserts
    The Geometry of Pasta

    I love looking at cookbooks.  Though many of the recipes have the same basic background, each cook or chef can give them a little twist to make them new again.  Sometimes cookbooks are also art.  There are even awards for artistic merit in cookbooks.  Two recent additions to the Appleton Public Library cookbook collection fall into the "art + cookbook" niche.

  5. Popcorn

    Popcorn

    This recipe book is separated into “Savory” and “Sweet” sections, as well as an “And More” section that incorporates popcorn into meals (I have never done anything from that last section).  The very beginning of the book talks a little about popping corn, including how to make your own microwave popcorn in paper lunch bags if you don’t own a popper or don’t like to make it on the stovetop.

     

  6. Joy of Cooking

    http://www.infosoup.org/search~S75?/Xjoy+of+cooking&searchscope=75&SORT=DZ/Xjoy+of+cooking&searchscope=75&SORT=DZ&SUBKEY=joy+of+cooking/1%2C83%2C83%2CB/frameset&FF=Xjoy+of+cooking&searchscope=75&SORT=DZ&12%2C12%2C

    This is a very worthy reference text for cooks at any level. Yes, you can now “Google” white sauce, etc and get any amount of suggestions, but this book was my go to place for all things cooking before that option was available. And it still holds.

  7. The Flavor Bible

    The Flavor Bible

    One night I was preparing dinner from a recipe and, tasting it, realized it needed something. I added an ingredient to a small portion of it – an ingredient I didn’t particularly like – and found it was the perfect flavor foil. This was a particularly favorable feat because I did not even consult my copy of The Flavor Bible but, instead, mentally retrieved its explanation of balancing flavors and considered how I could emphasize or ‘push’ the existing taste to a brighter level.

  8. 4 books: Restrictive Eating & Women's Self-Denial

    Unbearable Lightness, by Portia de Rossi
    Going Hungry: writers on desire, self-denial, and overcoming anorexia
    Gaining: the truth about life after eating disorders
    Appetites: why women want

    I frequently read in subject ‘clumps.’ Upon reading an interesting fact or blurb, I typically search for more books and articles in that area until my interest has run its course. In this case, what sparked my inquiry into restrictive eating disorders was, for me, a very unusual source.

  9. American Pie

    American Pie: My Search for the Perfect Pizza (2003)

    Peter Reinhart is a major American authority and writer on bread baking. I came across American Pie several years ago while searching the Library catalog for anything else by Reinhart. Since I regularly made homemade pizza, it immediately appealed to me. A week later I purchased my own copy.

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