Picture Book

  1. The Man with the Violin

     

    Dylan is the type of boy who sees things that others often miss. One cold day, Dylan and his mom are rushing around town. Dylan notices the details. He sees an old radio, a man reading a newspaper upside down and a child standing on a bench in red boots. His mom pulls Dylan along to their next destination - the metro station. The station is loud, and everyone hurries to find their train.

  2. My Name is Blessing

    My Name is Blessing

     

    Born with two fingers on his right hand and none on his left, his mother named him Muthini, which means suffering. He lives with his Grandmother and eight of his cousins. There are cruel taunts from the villagers and never enough food, but his Grandmother, his Nyanya, loves him very much. Still, nine is too many when food is scarce and Muthini is the youngest. So, one day, his Grandmother takes him to a school to see if there is a place for him there.

  3. Santa Claus and the Three Bears

    Santa Claus and the Three Bears

     In this clever, Christmassy take on a beloved fairytale, Papa, Mama and Baby are polar bears; when they are out walking, waiting for their Christmas pudding to cool, a certain special visitor comes to call, hungry and tired after finishing most of his holiday rounds.  Santa Claus thinks the pudding has been left for him, and thereby hangs the rest of the tale!  Santa, the bears, and their cozy house and surroundings are charmingly detailed in soft watercolors by mother-daughter duo Jane and Brooke Dyer.

     

  4. The House that Santa Built

    The House that Santa Built

    A traditional nursery rhyme is given a cute Christmas twist with a little help from Santa Claus, and a lot from de Las Casas and Stone-Barker.  Based on “The House that Jack Built,” and similar to the team's Halloween version, The House that Witchy Built, The House that Santa Built is a rollicking romp of rhythm, with elves and reindeer and snow  and—of course—children taking part of the arctic antics in and out of Santa’s castle.   The cut-paper collage illustrations are fun and fanciful.   There are plenty of sound effects that make this a p

  5. Me First

    Me First

     

    In this book, translated from the French, a duckling is determined to be first at everything in his day, from going outside, to fishing, to bathing, to lunch.  Until he hears humans at lunchtime discussing the lunchtime menu: duck.  He slinks away slyly, meowing all the way.  He has learned that being first is maybe not always the best option!  I love Di Giacomo's illustrations--bright and vibrant colors.  Highly recommended for preschool through grade 2.

  6. Christmas Chaos

    Christmas Chaos
    Zoo Hideout

    Are you looking for a fun gift idea?  Something new for “Where’s Waldo” fans?  Or just a way to keep the kiddos busy while they wait for Christmas?  Then bring a little “Christmas Chaos” into your life!  It’s one of several books in the “Seek It Out” series by Picture Window Books, a division of Capstone Press.  The book features 14 scenes, laid out in two-page spreads, which feature a different winter holiday experience: the center of a busy shopping mall, Santa’s workshop, ski slope, skating rink, a gingerbread village, a Kwanzaa celebration, among others

  7. Hoop Genius: How a Desperate Teacher and a Rowdy Gym Class Invented Basketball

    In 1891 a school teacher named James Naismith, desperate to manage a rowdy gym class in Springfield, Massachusetts, invented a new game he called "Basket Ball". It started with a list of rules scratched on paper, two old peach baskets and a soccer ball. The game was an instant sensation. The origin of the national sport of basketball is humorously written and illustrated in this picture book. Enjoy the original first draft of "Basket Ball" rules inside the cover. Author's notes add biographical details for the curious reader.

  8. Daisy Gets Lost

     

    Daisy and her ball are back! The day begins with Daisy and her owner playing ball near a forest. As Daisy’s ball rolls into the woods, Daisy discovers something new to chase...A SQUIRREL! Quickly, Daisy dashes deeper into the forest after the squirrel and finds herself lost. Will she ever find her way home?

  9. Flying Solo

    Flying Solo

     

    Almost everyone has heard of Amelia Earhart, but Ruth Elder is a new name to many.  Ruth wanted to be the first woman to cross the Atlantic Ocean solo in 1927, just like Charles Lindbergh.  Unfortunately, after 36 hours in the air, Ruth had serious trouble with an oil line rupture and had to abandon her plane in the ocean.  Fortunately, there was a ship nearby to rescue her.  Ruth charmed her way into the public's eyes, and by 1929 forty women met to begin a cross country race. 

  10. This is the Rope

    This is the Rope

     

    I learned from the author's note of this book that the time period between the early 1900s until the mid 1970s was considered "the Great Migration" where more than 6 million African Americans moved from the south to Northern cities such as New York City.  The book is dedicated to those who left the South to move to the North.

     

  11. Only a Witch Can Fly

    Only a Witch Can Fly

    No tricks, just treats!  There are many great books with Halloween stories and poems, and many are currently on display at the library.  One of my favorites is Alison McGhee’s Only a Witch Can Fly.  The author uses a beautiful old form of poetry with a mesmerizing rhythm, to relate the feelings of a young girl who longs to fly on a chilly but enchanted Halloween night, even if it means leaving the warmth of home, familiar things, and doubts and fears behind.

  12. Ah ha!

    Ah ha!

     

    A frog peacefully resting on a rock exhales, “AAHH!” His rest is interrupted by a boy with a jar who captures him gleefully exclaiming, “Ah Ha!” An excited puppy paws the jar, and the frog flies out yelling, “AAHH!” Creating expressive dialogue by rearranging only two letters, this story cleverly conveys the emotions of a frog and the creatures he encounters as he hops out of the frying pan and into the fire time and time again.

  13. Tito Puente, Mambo King /Tito Puente, Rey del Mambo

    Tito Puente, Mambo King /Tito Puente, Rey del Mambo

    This bilingual English/Spanish book celebrates the life of the great Latin Jazz musician Ernest “Tito” Puente (1923-2000).  Readers learn about Tito in different stages of his life: as a baby (in New York City of Puerto Rican parents), banging out rhythms on pots and pans; as a kid drumming and dancing his way to talent show success (but still finding time to play baseball with the neighborhood kids); as a young man in the Navy serving his country while developing his gift of playing and writing music; and as a professional musician who wins fame, fortune, love and admiration by using

  14. Tap the Magic Tree

    Tap the Magic Tree

     

    This interactive picture book is nothing but fun from beginning to end.

  15. Desmond and the Very Mean Word

    Desmond and the Very Mean Word

     

    According to the author's note at the back of the book, this story is inspired by something that actually happened to the author (Archbishop Tutu) as a child in South Africa. 

  16. No Fits, Nilson!

    Picture a giant teal gorilla with yellow shoes and six watches. That’s Nilson. Now, imagine a small girl with dark bobbed-hair wearing a red jumper and rainbow tights. That’s Amelia.

    Nilson and Amelia are best friends. They do everything together from playing music to building towers. Nilson is normally cool until the slightest thing sets him off. If a block wiggles and knocks down his entire structure, Nilson goes from calm and collected to throwing a gorilla-sized tantrum in 0.2 seconds. Trust me - his growl is impressive!

  17. Monstergarten

    Book cover

    Let’s face it - starting school can be nerve racking. Patrick is a tiny, pink furball of a monster with striped horns and a love of cowboy boots. It’s the day before he starts Monstergarten, and a first grader tells Patrick that he must be scary for school. Like all skills, Patrick needs to practice. He has several humorous and failed attempts at scaring his friend Kevin, his cat Snowball (just a heads up, you do NOT want to meet Snowball in a dark alley) and his sister.

  18. Knit Your Bit

    Knit Your Bit

     

    "Knit Your Bit" was a slogan of the American Red Cross during World War I when the Red Cross decided there would not be enough warm clothes for the soldiers over the cold winter in Europe.  Men, women, and children began knitting for soldiers.  There really was a "knit-in" at Central Park in New York City on July 30, 1918, which is the setting for this fabulous historical fiction. 

  19. My Dad Thinks He’s Funny

    My Dad Thinks He's Funny
    Saturday is Dadurday
    Everyone Can Learn to Ride a Bicycle
    Giddy-Up Daddy!
    Just Like My Papa
    Baby Barbells the Dad’s Guide to Fitness and Fathering
    Daddy Loves Me

     

    Father’s Day may be over, but dads are still awesome. Check out these fun picture books about (and for) fathers.

  20. A Splash of Red

    A Splash of Red

     

    This outstanding non-fiction picture book for older readers tells the story of African American artist Horace Pippin.  A quote from the book: "Pictures just come to my mind...and I tell my heart to go ahead," is touching when you think of a child who did not have real art supplies of his own until he won a contest.  During World War I Horace was wounded in the right shoulder, and was unable to draw the way he had loved to so much. 

  21. Inside Outside

    Inside Outside

    These opposites, and other concepts, are delightfully explored in this wordless picture book by artist Lizi Boyd.  The front cover depicts a boy, dog at his side, peering out the window of a cheery house, while birds and other creatures fly and frolic in the yard.   On the title page, the boy is at the open door, inviting the reader/viewer into his peaceful, happy world of dreams, plans, projects and play.  Inside, he contentedly makes preparations for spring planting, while out the windows, two snowmen are in view.  Each subsequent page shows a scene from a room in

  22. Let's Sing a Lullaby With the Brave Cowboy

    Let's Sing a Lullaby With the Brave Cowboy

    I love Jan Thomas’ silly, charming books with her bold, colorful comic-style illustrations, from Rhyming Dust Bunnies to Is Everyone Ready for Fun?  Let’s Sing a Lullaby with the Brave Cowboy is her latest to date, and in my opinion, another hit. The cowboy of the title is actually not so brave; in his attempts to settle his cows down for the night, he interrupts his own lullaby with startled exclamations about what he imagines is lurking in the dark.  The cows calm and reassure him--until, that is,  something really IS in the shadows!

  23. Henry and the Cannons

    Henry and the Cannons

     

    In 1775, the British Army had settled in Boston, and General Washington had no way of getting them to leave.  Bookstore owner Henry Knox had the idea to retrieve 59 cannons from Fort Ticonderoga...in the middle of the winter.  This involved traveling over ice, snow, mountains, woods, lakes, and once in a while there was a road to follow.  After fifty days of traveling from Fort Ticonderoga, Henry arrived in Boston with all 59 cannons. 

  24. Around the Neighborhood:

    Around the Neighborhood:

     

    Around the Neighborhood: a Counting Lullaby is an adaptation of "Over in the Meadow", the classic folk song that was first written down in 1870.  A mother and her baby baby set off for a walk around the neighborhood, and see numerous animals that a child might normally see in their neighborhood, such as cats, crows, bees, or ladybugs.  The illustrations were produced digitally, and are easy to recognize, with bright colors galore.

  25. Some Babies Are Wild

    Some Babies Are Wild

    April is National Poetry Month!  Celebrate it, the Fox Cities Book Festival, nature, too, with a sweet and simple poem by versatile author Marion Dane Bauer.  Its lines provide the text for this beautiful picture book, with intimate portraits of various wild baby animals and animal families by renowned nature photographer Stan Tekiela (one of the featured authors at this year’s Fox Cities Book Festival).  Tekiela captures on camera many young critters, from slow turtle hatchlings to a frisky cougar kitten; from a soft rabbit kit to prickly porcupettes; from little possums hit

  26. The Price of Freedom:

    The Price of Freedom:

     

    This superb factual tale of John Price is fascinating.  John Price escaped from slavery in January 1856.  After crossing the frozen Ohio River, he was in Ohio, was slavery was not allowed.  He wasn't completely safe though, the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 allowed slave owners to capture their runaway slaves anywhere in the United States, even in states where slavery was against the law, like Ohio.  Canada was Price's destination; slavery was completely outlawed there.  Price stopped for the winter in Oberlin, Ohio.

  27. I Love Our Earth--Amo Nuestra Tierra

    I Love Our Earth--Amo Nuestra Tierra

     

    This bilingual poem by the late author of the famous Brown Bear, Brown Bear series, Bill Martin Jr. and Michael Sampson tells some of the very descriptive reasons our Earth is so beautiful.  Dan Lipow's photographs are lush and bright with color.  The children featured in the pictures are from multiple cultures, although the photos do not identify them.  This book was recently successfully shared in a Spanish/English bilingual storytime.  For all ages.

  28. The Wing Wing Brothers Math Spectacular

    The Wing Wing Brothers Math Spectacular

    Meet Wendell, Wilmer, Willy Woody and Walter—5 bird-like juggler brothers who perform together in a hilarious stage show, while demonstrating basic math concepts such as counting, addition, subtraction and comparison.  The reader audience will learn as they laugh at the Wing Wing Brothers’ antics and comic appearance.  Parents and teachers will appreciate that the book meets the Common Core Standards for kindergarten mathematics; kids will appreciate the goofiness and fun.

    Recommended for kids ages 3-7.

  29. Each Kindness

    Each Kindness

    Regretting a lost opportunity to offer friendship and kindness is the strong, thought-provoking message of Jacqueline Woodson’s Each Kindness, which won the 2013 Charlotte Zolotow Award.

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